How Clique Migrated Smoothly to the Newest AWS EC2 C5 Instance

In a need to focus resources on core activities, Clique Communications turned to testRTC for stress testing and sizing. Clique API provides web-based voice and text application programming interfaces. In their eight years of existence, they have grown to support over 20 million users across 150 countries. This amounts to over 500 million minutes per […]

Using testRTC for WebRTC-PSTN testing and monitoring

When we started a couple of years ago, we started receiving requests from contact center vendors to support scenarios that involve both WebRTC and PSTN. Most of these were customers calling from a regular phone to an agent sitting in front of his browser and accepting the call using WebRTC. Or the opposite – contact […]

[Webinar Recording] Creating a Kickass WebRTC Monitor

A few weeks ago, we’ve hosted a webinar on creating an active monitoring system for your WebRTC application. Obviously, we’ve used testRTC for that. We went through the following topics: Why is WebRTC monitoring different than VoIP or Web monitoring? (that’s because it is a bit of both) What do we mean when we say […]

WebRTC Application Monitoring: Do you Wipe or Wash?

UPDATE: Recording of this webinar can be found here. If you are running an application then you are most probably monitoring it already. You’ve got New Relic, Datadog or some other cloud service or on premise monitoring setup handling your APM (Application Performance Management). What does that mean exactly with WebRTC? If we do the […]

Advanced Testing: Manipulating getUserMedia and Available Devices

Philipp Hancke is not new here on our blog. He has assisted us when we wrote the series on webrtc-internals. He is also not squeamish about writing his own testing environment and sharing the love. This time, he wanted to share a piece of code that takes device availability test automation in WebRTC to a […]

We’ve Partnered Up With Frozen Mountain

Guess what? We’ve partnered with Frozen Mountain. If you are developing a WebRTC application that is self hosted service on your own (AWS, bare metal or whatever cloud or data center), then you’ve got your hands full with work. That work includes a lot in the domain of stress testing the service, trying to size […]

Automating Your WebRTC Product Testing (Recorded session)

I took part this week in Twilio’s Signal event in London. As with the previous Signal event I attended, this one was excellent (but that’s for some other post). Twilio were kind enough to invite me to talk at their event, which resulted in the recorded session below: In the first part of this session, […]

Automated WebRTC Testing using testRTC

Yesterday, we hosted a webinar on testRTC. This time, we were really focused on showing some live demos of our service. I wanted this one to be useful, so I sat down earlier this week, working on a general story outline with the idea of showing live how you can write a test script from […]

How Many Sessions Can a Kurento Server Hold?

Here’s a question we come across quite often at testRTC. You decided to self develop your own service. Manage your own media servers. And now that time comes to understand your ongoing costs as well as decide on the scale out scheme – at what point do you launch/spawn a new server to take up […]

How to Prepare Your WebRTC Application for a Surge in Traffic

OK, this is the moment you’ve been waiting for: there’s a huge surge in traffic on your WebRTC application. Success! You even had the prescience to place all of your web application’s assets on a CDN and whatever uptime monitoring service you use, be it New Relic, Datadog or a homegrown Nagios solution – says […]